Scholarship Directory

Scholarship Directory

The American Councils Title VIII Research Scholar Program provides full support for graduate students, faculty, and independent scholars seeking to conduct in-country, independent research for three to nine consecutive months in Central Asia, Moldova, Russia, the South Caucasus, and Ukraine. Scholars in the social sciences and humanities are eligible to apply for the program. While a wide-range of topics receive support each year, all funded research must contribute to a body of knowledge enabling the U.S. to better understand the region and formulate effective policies within it. All applicants should clearly describe the policy-relevance of their work, be it in anthropology, history, international relations, political science, or some other field. For further information on deadlines and requirements, please call 202-833-7522 or e-mail outbound@americancouncils.org.

Visit Url: researchfellowships.americancouncils.org

The American Indian Foundation is looking for young American professionals to work with leading non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in India for ten months from September to June. The program serves as an exchange of technical skills and intellectual resources which aims to build the capacity of Indian NGOs while developing American leaders with an understanding of India. The organizations are working on causes related to livelihood, primary education, public health and human rights. During the Fellowship, AIF provides a range of support to Fellows, including training, technical support, on-going supervision, a stipend that includes a housing, food and transport allowance, supplemental health insurance as well as travel to and from India. Eligible applicants must demonstrate strong interest in India's development sector, be between the ages of 21 and 35, have achieved an undergraduate degree prior to starting the program, and be a US citizen or US permanent resident. This fellowship has an application deadline of early January. For more information, please contact the William J. Clinton Fellowship for Service in India by e-mail at info@aif.org.

Visit Url: aif.org/investment-area/leadership

During this yearlong fellowship, Congressional Black Caucus Fellows work 40 hours per week on a range of staff assignments, including legislative analysis, responding to constituent mail, drafting legislation, and coordinating logistics and public testimony for congressional hearings. Fellows also have educational enrichment opportunities through seminars on policy and politics. These seminars explore hot-button policy issues, the politics of policymaking and policy implementation, and evaluation of policy already implemented. Fellows are also exposed to the history and work of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC), and are prepared to analyze the impact of policies on African Americans and other minority groups. Office assignments as full-time legislative aides run from September through August. All Fellows must be able to participate for the full term of the program. If selected, applicants are expected to complete all professional qualifying exams (e.g. bar exams, medical boards, dissertation defenses, and comprehensive exams) before the fellowship or defer until the end of the fellowship. Participants in the Congressional Fellows Program must reside in or relocate to the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. The compensation for thefellowship term is $40,000, with benefits. Fellows are responsible for their own travel, housing, and other associated expenses. The application deadline is in mid-April. For more information, please see the fellowship website or e-mail the Congressional Black Caucus at info@cbcfinc.org.

Visit Url: cbcfinc.org/programs/leadership-development/1...

The Davis-Putter Scholarship Fund provides grants to students actively working for peace and justice. These need-based scholarships are awarded to those able to do academic work at the university level and who are part of the progressive movement on the campus and in the community.The first and most important qualification for a Davis-Putter Scholarship is active participation in struggles for civil rights, economic justice, international solidarity or other progressive issues. Other factors taken into consideration are the applicant's financial need and ability to perform academically at the college level. Davis-Putter scholars are both graduate and undergraduate students and must be enrolled in an accredited school and receiving college credit for the time period covered by their grant. This scholarship has an application deadline of early April. For more information, please see the scholarship website.

Visit Url: www.davisputter.org

The Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation provides selected social entrepreneurs with funding of $100,000 annually for three years. The funds are specifically and solely for entrepreneurs starting new non-profit organizations. The Foundation accepts proposals for a variety of public service areas, including, but not limited to, education, youth and families, the environment, arts, health, and community and economic development. They seek organizations that are or plan to be national or global in scope, and select those which demonstrate innovative ways to solve existing social problems. For more information, please see the fellowship website.

Visit Url: www.drkfoundation.org/what-we-fund.html

The Bill Emerson National Hunger Fellowship is an 11-month fellowship that allows recent college graduates and others to gain real-world exposure to issues of domestic poverty and hunger. Students receive a 10-day orientation and training session in Washington, D.C., followed by a field placement in a host community. At field sites, fellows perform policy or substantive community service work, such as establishing food recovery or school feeding programs. At policy sites located in Washington, D.C., fellows conduct research, prepare reports, and assist with lobbying efforts. The Fellowship awards a "living allowance" of $14,500, in addition to health insurance, a housing subsidy, and reimbursement for travel expenses. This award is open to U.S. citizens or permanent legal residents aged 18 or older. Most applicants are recent college graduates with a variety of backgrounds and life experiences, and may also be graduate students. The application deadline is in mid-January. For more information, please call the Congressional Hunger Center at 202-547-7022 x29.

Visit Url: www.emersonapplication.org

The Florida Bar Foundation's Legal Services Summer Fellowship Program funds law students all over the country to work meeting the legal needs of the poor. 40 Fellowships which occur over 11 weeks are offered to first-year ($5,500) and second-year law students ($7,000) who work during the summer for organizations providing direct civil legal services for the poor. This fellowship has an application deadline of mid-January. For more information, please see the fellowship website.

Visit Url: www.flabarfndn.org/grant-programs/lsa/summer-...

The Frederick Douglass Distinguished Scholars Program is designed to promote educationial opportunity, diversity, and access. Preference will be given to first-generation students as well as those from diverse ethnic, cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Academically, the most competitive applicants should have a 4.0 GPA (unweighted) or 4.2 GPA (weighted). They should also demonstrate a lifelong commitment to careers in social justice and working for the advancement of people in need. This application deadline for this scholarship is in mid-January. For more information, please contact the director of the Frederick Douglass Distinguished Scholars Program by calling 202-885-6213 or emailing fds@american.edu.

Visit Url: www.american.edu/financialaid/fdsprogram.cfm

The Galbraith Scholars Program aims to illuminate graduate school and career options for talented undergraduates who aspire to apply themselves to important social problems. Students selected for the program win full fellowships covering travel, accommodation, and activity expenses to attend a special five-day session at Harvard University led by Harvard faculty, doctoral fellows, and social policy practitioners. Galbraith Scholars explore a range of social policy issues through graduate-style seminars, panel discussions, workshops, off-site field trips, and collaborative activities. The Galbraith Scholars program seeks students of exceptional promise and uncommon perspective who have demonstrated interests in issues of inequality and social policy. College sophomores, juniors, and seniors enrolled in any U.S. college or university are eligible for selection. The program is designed to cultivate a diverse new generation of scholars and leaders, and students of color and students of limited economic means are particularly encouraged to apply. This program has an application deadline of early April. For more information, please see the fellowship website.

Visit Url: www.ksg.harvard.edu/inequality/Summer/Galbrai...

The Humanity in Action Fellowship brings together international groups of university students and recent graduates to explore national histories of discrimination and resistance, as well as examples of issues affecting different minority groups today. Each program is highly interdisciplinary and features daily lectures and discussions, as well as site visits to government agencies, non-profit and community organizations, museums and memorials. The programs seek to bridge the gap between theory and practice and highlight different models of action to remedy injustice. The objective of the HIA Fellowship is to facilitate a collective exploration of the social and political roots of discrimination, as well as to provide a forum where potential solutions to some of today's most challenging issues can be considered and discussed. This fellowship has an application deadline of early January. For more information, please see the fellowship website.

Visit Url: www.humanityinaction.org/pages/91-main

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