Just Apply

Elevate - The Honor Society Magazine
Just Apply
Apr 08,2016

We’ve all heard the quote, “Don’t let the fear of striking out keep you from playing the game.” As cliché as it is, that quote has guided me to jobs and opportunities that I could have only dreamed of.

In college it’s easy to feel like there is time before you have to get into the job world. In college it is easy to feel like you are unworthy of a job because you don’t have a lot of experience or that you are unfit for the job because of age. It is hard to have the guts to put yourself, your confidence, your accomplishments, and your hard work out into the job world when the constant fear of someone being better than you, of the interviewers hating you, and of being rejected is constantly at the back of your mind. It is difficult and scary to send out 30-something job applications and resumes to potential employers and go weeks with only one email back saying that the position has been filled.

I’ve heard from students on multiple occasions that they don’t know where to start, that they are afraid to send out their resumes because they are young and don’t have as much experience as the other people applying. But the fact of the matter is that you don’t know anything about the other applicants, they could be completely inferior, or that job could go unapplied for. You could be the one that the company has been waiting for; you could be their holy grail, the answer to their prayers, the Holly Flax to their Michael Scott.

I am not going to lie and tell all of my readers (I hope that you’re actually out there) that you are all the best and that no one is better than you, I am firm believer in telling the truth. However, you are never going to get experience, become the best, become better, grow in your field of choice, or get jobs if you let the fear of being rejected guide in your decisions to apply or not apply for that job.

What’s so bad about sending your resume to a job that you would love to have? They may love you, think you’re an awesome fit and then offer you your, potential, dream job. And even if you hate the job, even if it doesn’t turn out to be the best job you’ve ever had you still put yourself out there and you’ve learned from it. If you don’t get the job, at least you tried, at least you applied, and rejection builds character. Life is not made in the things you decided not to do, and that is how college works. College is putting yourself out there and trying to make the most out of your time and the thousands of dollars that you spend every semester.

So I encourage you all to apply for that internship that you think is a long shot. Apply for every job listing you see, work hard, go out on a limb, make sure your resume accurately reflects who you are and your abilities, and just apply. 

About the Author
Kara Jobmann's picture
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Just Apply

 Just Apply

Just Apply

Just Apply

We’ve all heard the quote, “Don’t let the fear of striking out keep you from playing the game.” As cliché as it is, that quote has guided me to jobs and opportunities that I could have only dreamed of.

In college it’s easy to feel like there is time before you have to get into the job world. In college it is easy to feel like you are unworthy of a job because you don’t have a lot of experience or that you are unfit for the job because of age. It is hard to have the guts to put yourself, your confidence, your accomplishments, and your hard work out into the job world when the constant fear of someone being better than you, of the interviewers hating you, and of being rejected is constantly at the back of your mind. It is difficult and scary to send out 30-something job applications and resumes to potential employers and go weeks with only one email back saying that the position has been filled.

I’ve heard from students on multiple occasions that they don’t know where to start, that they are afraid to send out their resumes because they are young and don’t have as much experience as the other people applying. But the fact of the matter is that you don’t know anything about the other applicants, they could be completely inferior, or that job could go unapplied for. You could be the one that the company has been waiting for; you could be their holy grail, the answer to their prayers, the Holly Flax to their Michael Scott.

I am not going to lie and tell all of my readers (I hope that you’re actually out there) that you are all the best and that no one is better than you, I am firm believer in telling the truth. However, you are never going to get experience, become the best, become better, grow in your field of choice, or get jobs if you let the fear of being rejected guide in your decisions to apply or not apply for that job.

What’s so bad about sending your resume to a job that you would love to have? They may love you, think you’re an awesome fit and then offer you your, potential, dream job. And even if you hate the job, even if it doesn’t turn out to be the best job you’ve ever had you still put yourself out there and you’ve learned from it. If you don’t get the job, at least you tried, at least you applied, and rejection builds character. Life is not made in the things you decided not to do, and that is how college works. College is putting yourself out there and trying to make the most out of your time and the thousands of dollars that you spend every semester.

So I encourage you all to apply for that internship that you think is a long shot. Apply for every job listing you see, work hard, go out on a limb, make sure your resume accurately reflects who you are and your abilities, and just apply.