Workplace ~ Leadership

Elevate - The Honor Society Magazine
Workplace ~ Leadership
Jul 23,2015

If you think children's books are too childish to encompass leadership tips (esp in the workplace) - think again!

 

In the book, The Day the Crayons Quit, Duncan finds a feasible conclusion to making everyone or in this case every crayon color happier. 

 

Have you ever worked with others who seem to feel the following ways? Or maybe you can relate to the color coded emotions below?

 

If so, how did you/your leadership handle these situations? (for the full story The Day the Crayons Quit - check out the link below)

 

Red - feels overworked

Purple - hates to color outside the lines

Light brown/dark tan/beige - proud but, feels 2nd place to the color brown

Gray - too much work to color, feels tired

White - unnoticed, white doesn't show up, why bother

Black - outlines only, doesn't feel "bright" enough

Green - enjoys working, no problems minus his concern for colors Yellow and Orange

Yellow - upset about Orange and believes Yellow is the true color of the sun

Orange - upset with Yellow and believes Orange is the true color of the sun

Blue - all used up and too short to color more, overworked

Pink - feels upset that others think she is a "girl color" & desires to color a monster

Peach - feels overexposed and wants a new look

 

In the end, Duncan used his leadership to let the colors create a "new picture" in this case better leadership = listening to others and encouraging collaboration and creativity (*the opposite of micomanaging)!

 

Story Link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szK-NqBmfi8

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Workplace ~ Leadership

 Workplace ~ Leadership

Workplace ~ Leadership

Workplace ~ Leadership

If you think children's books are too childish to encompass leadership tips (esp in the workplace) - think again!

 

In the book, The Day the Crayons Quit, Duncan finds a feasible conclusion to making everyone or in this case every crayon color happier. 

 

Have you ever worked with others who seem to feel the following ways? Or maybe you can relate to the color coded emotions below?

 

If so, how did you/your leadership handle these situations? (for the full story The Day the Crayons Quit - check out the link below)

 

Red - feels overworked

Purple - hates to color outside the lines

Light brown/dark tan/beige - proud but, feels 2nd place to the color brown

Gray - too much work to color, feels tired

White - unnoticed, white doesn't show up, why bother

Black - outlines only, doesn't feel "bright" enough

Green - enjoys working, no problems minus his concern for colors Yellow and Orange

Yellow - upset about Orange and believes Yellow is the true color of the sun

Orange - upset with Yellow and believes Orange is the true color of the sun

Blue - all used up and too short to color more, overworked

Pink - feels upset that others think she is a "girl color" & desires to color a monster

Peach - feels overexposed and wants a new look

 

In the end, Duncan used his leadership to let the colors create a "new picture" in this case better leadership = listening to others and encouraging collaboration and creativity (*the opposite of micomanaging)!

 

Story Link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szK-NqBmfi8