Change is For the Better: 8 Signs that You're in the Wrong Major

Elevate - The Honor Society Magazine
Change is For the Better: 8 Signs that You're in the Wrong Major
Apr 15,2019
how to change college majors

According to the US Department of education, about 30 percent of college students will switch their major within their first 3 years. The fact is most students don't know what career they want to get into, which is why knowing how to change college majors is important.

Here we will dive further into knowing when to change your major and how to go about it. Read on to better determine if you're on the right path with your chosen major. 

1. You Chose the Major for Your Parents

Your parents are biotechs, your grandparents were biotechs, so it's only natural that you would become a biotech. Right? Not necessarily. Choosing a path simply because your parents did is not just illogical, it's unhealthy.

Here's a harsh reality many don't want to face. One day your parents will be gone, but the choices you made for them will still exist. Will your decision to pursue what they wanted for you really matter when they aren't around to see it?

More importantly, would you want your future children to follow a certain path just because you did?

2. You Chose the Major to Make money

As Gordon Gekko would say "Green is good". That is until it's making you miserable. Money means security and it can open the doors to many opportunities that can enhance your overall happiness and well being.

But take this important fact into account: a recent study showed that money only increases our happiness up to a certain point.

That means statistically, a person making $200,000 is no happier than one making $120,000. Once you have enough to meet your general needs, you reach a "satiate point" where more money doesn't enhance your overall happiness.

Something to consider if you're choosing money over passion.

3. You Hadn't Found Your Passion Yet

Most college students choose their major as soon as they enter college, if not before. This means your decision is primarily based on your experiences in high school and what you thought you wanted.

So is it any surprise that you didn't know what your passion was before the age of 19? Or that perhaps, something better and more interesting came along once you were out experiencing life?

The good news is, you aren't bound to your major for life, and there's still time to choose a different path.

4. The Job Market Changed

When you entered college your industry of choice looked pretty promising. Then things suddenly took a turn for the worse. It could be because of a change in the political climate, a global crisis, or simply a new development in technology.

Whatever the reason is, what once seemed like a safe bet now is not. Yes, we did say that money isn't a good reason to choose a major. However, you will need to eat, and be able to pay for basic necessities like shelter and clothing.

If your major can't provide you with a solid job, or the demand is much smaller than the options, it may be time to switch.

5. You Have Zero Interest in Anything Being Taught

Let's take a moment to do some math. The average full-time worker works 40 hours a week. That comes out to over 2,000 hours a year. If you stay in the same career for a decade, you're looking at over 20,000 hours spent focused on a specific subject.

Now, if you can't stay awake through one hour of learning about your major, do you really believe you'll be able to handle over 20,000 hours?

6. Your Major Doesn't Fit Your Morals

Creating a promising career and learning about something you love are important steps to take in life. However, having morals and sticking to them is important as well.

There may come a time where the bloom on the rose fades, and you realize in order to succeed in your industry of choice you'll have to compromise those morals.

This will be a major turning point for you, however, there's something to be said about going with your gut. If the job doesn't feel right, change your focus. It doesn't mean you can't pursue your passion in a different way.

7. Your Grades are Rapidly Declining

While Einstein would argue that failure is a good thing, sometimes you have to know when failure is a sign that a certain major isn't right for you.

If you've taken on tutoring, have actively sought out extra help, have repeatedly taken the same class without seeing any improvement, it could mean you have no interest in learning or retaining the information.

Be honest with yourself on what's really happening behind your grades and know when it's a sign to move on.

8. Nothing in Your Daily Life Reflects Your Major

When something is a true passion, it's evident in multiple areas of your life. For example, if you are studying to become a veterinarian, there's a good chance you have pets of your own, enjoy wildlife documentaries and have read literature on the subject.

If your only interaction with the subject of your major happens on campus, it's a good sign that you're not passionate about it.

Bonus Signs

We really want you not only succeed but to be happy with the life you create for yourself. Here are some bonus signs that it's time to switch your major, just in case you still aren't sure. 

You Can't Stand Your Professors. Any of Them. 

It seems like a right of passage to experience at least one hellish professor during your college career. However, when every professor teaching your major is a nightmare to deal with, consider it a wake up call.

These are the kind of people your chosen industry attracts, which means you will come across these type of people often in your career. If a lifetime of dealing with similar characters sounds like a deal breaker, it's time to switch majors.

You Don't Know How to Change College Majors

Another common reason why college students remain stuck in their major? They don't know they have an option. Many students believe once they've chosen a major or have invested time in that major they aren't unable to switch.

Even worse, those that do want to switch simply don't know how. In this instance, a quick trip to your counselor should get you into the classes you really want.

Getting the Most Out of Your College Experience

Knowing how to change college majors, navigate your way through campus and land coveted internships are all part of the college experience. From your first class to the day you graduate you'll learn more about the things you want and why you want them.

If you're still not sure if you're on the right path to a career you love, we suggest checking out our Career Insider Guides for more information.

About the Author
Follow us for the latest at HonorSociety.org


Change is For the Better: 8 Signs that You're in the Wrong Major

 Change is For the Better: 8 Signs that You're in the Wrong Major

Change is For the Better: 8 Signs that You're in the Wrong Major

Change is For the Better: 8 Signs that You're in the Wrong Major

According to the US Department of education, about 30 percent of college students will switch their major within their first 3 years. The fact is most students don't know what career they want to get into, which is why knowing how to change college majors is important.

Here we will dive further into knowing when to change your major and how to go about it. Read on to better determine if you're on the right path with your chosen major. 

1. You Chose the Major for Your Parents

Your parents are biotechs, your grandparents were biotechs, so it's only natural that you would become a biotech. Right? Not necessarily. Choosing a path simply because your parents did is not just illogical, it's unhealthy.

Here's a harsh reality many don't want to face. One day your parents will be gone, but the choices you made for them will still exist. Will your decision to pursue what they wanted for you really matter when they aren't around to see it?

More importantly, would you want your future children to follow a certain path just because you did?

2. You Chose the Major to Make money

As Gordon Gekko would say "Green is good". That is until it's making you miserable. Money means security and it can open the doors to many opportunities that can enhance your overall happiness and well being.

But take this important fact into account: a recent study showed that money only increases our happiness up to a certain point.

That means statistically, a person making $200,000 is no happier than one making $120,000. Once you have enough to meet your general needs, you reach a "satiate point" where more money doesn't enhance your overall happiness.

Something to consider if you're choosing money over passion.

3. You Hadn't Found Your Passion Yet

Most college students choose their major as soon as they enter college, if not before. This means your decision is primarily based on your experiences in high school and what you thought you wanted.

So is it any surprise that you didn't know what your passion was before the age of 19? Or that perhaps, something better and more interesting came along once you were out experiencing life?

The good news is, you aren't bound to your major for life, and there's still time to choose a different path.

4. The Job Market Changed

When you entered college your industry of choice looked pretty promising. Then things suddenly took a turn for the worse. It could be because of a change in the political climate, a global crisis, or simply a new development in technology.

Whatever the reason is, what once seemed like a safe bet now is not. Yes, we did say that money isn't a good reason to choose a major. However, you will need to eat, and be able to pay for basic necessities like shelter and clothing.

If your major can't provide you with a solid job, or the demand is much smaller than the options, it may be time to switch.

5. You Have Zero Interest in Anything Being Taught

Let's take a moment to do some math. The average full-time worker works 40 hours a week. That comes out to over 2,000 hours a year. If you stay in the same career for a decade, you're looking at over 20,000 hours spent focused on a specific subject.

Now, if you can't stay awake through one hour of learning about your major, do you really believe you'll be able to handle over 20,000 hours?

6. Your Major Doesn't Fit Your Morals

Creating a promising career and learning about something you love are important steps to take in life. However, having morals and sticking to them is important as well.

There may come a time where the bloom on the rose fades, and you realize in order to succeed in your industry of choice you'll have to compromise those morals.

This will be a major turning point for you, however, there's something to be said about going with your gut. If the job doesn't feel right, change your focus. It doesn't mean you can't pursue your passion in a different way.

7. Your Grades are Rapidly Declining

While Einstein would argue that failure is a good thing, sometimes you have to know when failure is a sign that a certain major isn't right for you.

If you've taken on tutoring, have actively sought out extra help, have repeatedly taken the same class without seeing any improvement, it could mean you have no interest in learning or retaining the information.

Be honest with yourself on what's really happening behind your grades and know when it's a sign to move on.

8. Nothing in Your Daily Life Reflects Your Major

When something is a true passion, it's evident in multiple areas of your life. For example, if you are studying to become a veterinarian, there's a good chance you have pets of your own, enjoy wildlife documentaries and have read literature on the subject.

If your only interaction with the subject of your major happens on campus, it's a good sign that you're not passionate about it.

Bonus Signs

We really want you not only succeed but to be happy with the life you create for yourself. Here are some bonus signs that it's time to switch your major, just in case you still aren't sure. 

You Can't Stand Your Professors. Any of Them. 

It seems like a right of passage to experience at least one hellish professor during your college career. However, when every professor teaching your major is a nightmare to deal with, consider it a wake up call.

These are the kind of people your chosen industry attracts, which means you will come across these type of people often in your career. If a lifetime of dealing with similar characters sounds like a deal breaker, it's time to switch majors.

You Don't Know How to Change College Majors

Another common reason why college students remain stuck in their major? They don't know they have an option. Many students believe once they've chosen a major or have invested time in that major they aren't unable to switch.

Even worse, those that do want to switch simply don't know how. In this instance, a quick trip to your counselor should get you into the classes you really want.

Getting the Most Out of Your College Experience

Knowing how to change college majors, navigate your way through campus and land coveted internships are all part of the college experience. From your first class to the day you graduate you'll learn more about the things you want and why you want them.

If you're still not sure if you're on the right path to a career you love, we suggest checking out our Career Insider Guides for more information.