Pursue Your Philanthropic Passion

Elevate - The Honor Society Magazine
Pursue Your Philanthropic Passion
Jun 06,2019
Philanthropic

Pursue Your Philanthropic Passion

Pursue Your Philanthropic Passion

Philanthropy isn't just a buzzword for high-profile figures. Discover the philanthropic passion that mirrors the ways in which you want to give back.

Keyword(s): philanthropic

 

Are you struggling to pick a major? Do you wish that you could test out different careers before you commit to taking classes?

Every year, more than half of all high school students volunteer. Collectively, they volunteer an impressive 1.3 billion hours of their time.

Finding philanthropic opportunities can help you figure out which major to pick - and give you the joy of contributing to your local community.

If you're curious about volunteering, this article's for you. We'll give you the information you'll need to start making a difference. 

Philanthropy Isn't Just for Billionaires

The important thing to remember about philanthropic causes is that you don't have to be rich or famous.

Bill Gates and Oprah get a lot of media attention for their philanthropy, but there are thousands of unsung heroes volunteering every day.

Martin Luther King Jr. famously said, "Everybody can be great...because anybody can serve. You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love." 

Even if you're still in college, you can donate your money or time. In fact, Millennials top the list of committed volunteers, beating out Generation X and Baby Boomers. 

More than 80% of all Millennials donate to charity each year and spend at least an hour per week as a volunteer. 

Types of Philanthropy

If you're new to volunteering, you might be wondering what kind of philanthropic works you can do. The answer will vary by organization, but we've gathered together the top three kinds of volunteer opportunities.

Volunteering

If you've got an hour or two per week, we recommend volunteering at a local organization. You can help out at a local soup kitchen, bag and tag clothing donations, or even act as a mentor for school-aged children. 

If you're considering a career as a teacher, you might want to sign up as a big brother or sister. Even though you won't be in a classroom setting, you'll be practicing your communication skills. 

Hospitals often need volunteers. Even if you're not planning on becoming a nurse, you can still hold preemies or talk to people with Alzheimer's.

If you're passionate about working with the elderly, see if you can run a weekly dance or exercise class. It's a great way to connect with new people and contribute to their overall wellness. 

One of the best times to volunteer is when you've moved to a new city. Did you transfer to another college? Volunteering can help you adjust and make new friends. 

Making a Financial Donation

If your schedule doesn't have time for in-person volunteering, you can always donate money. Don't worry about the amount: charitable organizations are grateful for donations of any size. 

Before you give money to an organization, make sure you check them out online. What percentage of their donations goes to administrative costs?

How much money will the people or animals you're trying to help actually receive? If the CEO of a charitable organization makes millions every year, you might want to find another place to donate your money.

If you want to do more than just donate money, you might want to look into microloans. Microloans are small loans that are funded by eight to 10 people at a time. 

You will get your donation paid back over the course of several months, allowing you to use that donation to help fund another loan. 

Microloans are great because they help people in developing countries grow their businesses, upgrade their sanitary conditions, or find new places to live. 

Networking and Skill Donation

Perhaps the best way to donate to charity is by volunteering your skills. Are you awesome at coding and office work? Look for a non-profit that needs to update its database and do some outreach.

Are you good at organization? Reach out to an animal shelter or local food bank and offer to sort their donations. 

The best philanthropist examples involve a person using their skills and connections to improve their community.

Do you know someone who owns their own business? Talk to them about making a yearly donation to your favorite charity.

How to Figure Out Your Passion

Volunteering is a lot like choosing a major. You're looking for something that will hold your interest for years to come, that will help you grow as a person. 

If you're bored with your major, look back at the courses you've taken. Which ones stood out to you? 

Is there a specific language you're trying to learn? Maybe you could volunteer as a tutor for people who speak that language. They can practice their English and you can practice your foreign language skills. 

Don't feel like you have to sign on for a long-term commitment right away. Take the time to volunteer at a few local non-profits first. When you find the right fit, you'll know it. 

To get started, ask yourself a few questions. Do you want to volunteer in person, or would you rather donate online? Is there a group of people you really want to reach, or a certain age range you're more comfortable with?

Find a Local Philanthropic Organization

Once you get a sense of the kind of philanthropic work you'd like to do, it's time to find a local non-profit. 

To get started, talk to friends, family, and co-workers. Is there a particular place they like to volunteer? 

If you can, try to get a few friends to volunteer with you. The organization will appreciate the help and you'll feel more relaxed in a new environment. 

Another place to look for volunteer and donation opportunities is academic and social clubs. If you're in a fraternity or sorority, the chapter head probably has a list of great places to volunteer. 

We provide a wide range of scholarships to college students who volunteer. Even if you're just getting started with community service, you could qualify for a merit-based grant!

We care about helping students meet their career goals. Members have access to exclusive discounts, career information, and internships.

Check out our website and join today

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Pursue Your Philanthropic Passion

 Pursue Your Philanthropic Passion

Pursue Your Philanthropic Passion

Pursue Your Philanthropic Passion

Pursue Your Philanthropic Passion

Pursue Your Philanthropic Passion

Philanthropy isn't just a buzzword for high-profile figures. Discover the philanthropic passion that mirrors the ways in which you want to give back.

Keyword(s): philanthropic

 

Are you struggling to pick a major? Do you wish that you could test out different careers before you commit to taking classes?

Every year, more than half of all high school students volunteer. Collectively, they volunteer an impressive 1.3 billion hours of their time.

Finding philanthropic opportunities can help you figure out which major to pick - and give you the joy of contributing to your local community.

If you're curious about volunteering, this article's for you. We'll give you the information you'll need to start making a difference. 

Philanthropy Isn't Just for Billionaires

The important thing to remember about philanthropic causes is that you don't have to be rich or famous.

Bill Gates and Oprah get a lot of media attention for their philanthropy, but there are thousands of unsung heroes volunteering every day.

Martin Luther King Jr. famously said, "Everybody can be great...because anybody can serve. You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love." 

Even if you're still in college, you can donate your money or time. In fact, Millennials top the list of committed volunteers, beating out Generation X and Baby Boomers. 

More than 80% of all Millennials donate to charity each year and spend at least an hour per week as a volunteer. 

Types of Philanthropy

If you're new to volunteering, you might be wondering what kind of philanthropic works you can do. The answer will vary by organization, but we've gathered together the top three kinds of volunteer opportunities.

Volunteering

If you've got an hour or two per week, we recommend volunteering at a local organization. You can help out at a local soup kitchen, bag and tag clothing donations, or even act as a mentor for school-aged children. 

If you're considering a career as a teacher, you might want to sign up as a big brother or sister. Even though you won't be in a classroom setting, you'll be practicing your communication skills. 

Hospitals often need volunteers. Even if you're not planning on becoming a nurse, you can still hold preemies or talk to people with Alzheimer's.

If you're passionate about working with the elderly, see if you can run a weekly dance or exercise class. It's a great way to connect with new people and contribute to their overall wellness. 

One of the best times to volunteer is when you've moved to a new city. Did you transfer to another college? Volunteering can help you adjust and make new friends. 

Making a Financial Donation

If your schedule doesn't have time for in-person volunteering, you can always donate money. Don't worry about the amount: charitable organizations are grateful for donations of any size. 

Before you give money to an organization, make sure you check them out online. What percentage of their donations goes to administrative costs?

How much money will the people or animals you're trying to help actually receive? If the CEO of a charitable organization makes millions every year, you might want to find another place to donate your money.

If you want to do more than just donate money, you might want to look into microloans. Microloans are small loans that are funded by eight to 10 people at a time. 

You will get your donation paid back over the course of several months, allowing you to use that donation to help fund another loan. 

Microloans are great because they help people in developing countries grow their businesses, upgrade their sanitary conditions, or find new places to live. 

Networking and Skill Donation

Perhaps the best way to donate to charity is by volunteering your skills. Are you awesome at coding and office work? Look for a non-profit that needs to update its database and do some outreach.

Are you good at organization? Reach out to an animal shelter or local food bank and offer to sort their donations. 

The best philanthropist examples involve a person using their skills and connections to improve their community.

Do you know someone who owns their own business? Talk to them about making a yearly donation to your favorite charity.

How to Figure Out Your Passion

Volunteering is a lot like choosing a major. You're looking for something that will hold your interest for years to come, that will help you grow as a person. 

If you're bored with your major, look back at the courses you've taken. Which ones stood out to you? 

Is there a specific language you're trying to learn? Maybe you could volunteer as a tutor for people who speak that language. They can practice their English and you can practice your foreign language skills. 

Don't feel like you have to sign on for a long-term commitment right away. Take the time to volunteer at a few local non-profits first. When you find the right fit, you'll know it. 

To get started, ask yourself a few questions. Do you want to volunteer in person, or would you rather donate online? Is there a group of people you really want to reach, or a certain age range you're more comfortable with?

Find a Local Philanthropic Organization

Once you get a sense of the kind of philanthropic work you'd like to do, it's time to find a local non-profit. 

To get started, talk to friends, family, and co-workers. Is there a particular place they like to volunteer? 

If you can, try to get a few friends to volunteer with you. The organization will appreciate the help and you'll feel more relaxed in a new environment. 

Another place to look for volunteer and donation opportunities is academic and social clubs. If you're in a fraternity or sorority, the chapter head probably has a list of great places to volunteer. 

We provide a wide range of scholarships to college students who volunteer. Even if you're just getting started with community service, you could qualify for a merit-based grant!

We care about helping students meet their career goals. Members have access to exclusive discounts, career information, and internships.

Check out our website and join today